How Do I Treat a Weeping Wound?

A weeping wound should be soaked three times daily in warm water.
Applying a bandage will help keep dirt and debris out of the wound.
If a wound is severe, see a doctor or go to a hospital emergency room.
A sterile adhesive bandage can help with wound treatment.
Article Details
  • Written By: Patti Kate
  • Edited By: W. Everett
  • Last Modified Date: 04 December 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
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    Conjecture Corporation
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The most effective method of treating a weeping wound may vary depending on the discharge that is oozing from the wound. If the discharge is thick and yellow, this typically indicates an infection that needs to be treated by a medical professional. Blood that seeps from a wound may be stopped by applying pressure to the area. Dirt and debris should be gently cleaned from the area with warm soapy water. Do not scrub a weeping wound.

Depending upon the severity of the wound, constant pressure should be applied for at least 20 minutes or until bleeding has stopped. Always use a clean cloth or gauze, and avoid using tissue as this may cause further damage to the skin. If the wound is due to a burn blister, do not attempt to break the blister. If you notice fluid seeping from the blister, keep the area clean by gently patting it dry, then cover it with a loose sterile bandage. Change the bandage on daily, or more often if it becomes wet from fluid seeping through.

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Forming a blister from a wound is your body's way of protecting you from foreign matter and infection. Although a blister can be annoying, it serves an important function, and must not be forcefully broken or popped. If, however, the blister is larger than 4 inches (10.2 centimeters), you should consult with a physician. Be aware of signs that indicate a burn may have become infected. If you experience redness, pus, or severe pain, see your doctor promptly for treatment.

Doctors often treat an infected wound by performing a procedure known as incision and drain. After performing the procedure, your doctor may advise you to soak the wound up to three times daily in warm water. He may also prescribe a course of oral antibiotics to be taken for about 10 days. You should not attempt to treat an infected wound without advice from a medial professional.

Quite often, a minor scape or cut will cause slight weeping. A weeping wound that causes a small trickle of blood to ooze is generally nothing serious. After the area is thoroughly cleaned, apply some antibiotic ointment and a bandage. The bandage will prevent dirt and germs from entering the bloodstream through open skin. A bandage will also help the wound heal by allowing the broken skin to eventually close.

If your weeping wound is 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) or larger and you are unable to stop the bleeding or oozing of blood, you should seek medical treatment. If your physician's office is closed, go straight to the hospital emergency room. A deep wound might require sutures. Your physician may also recommend having a tetanus shot if you haven't received one in 10 years.

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Discuss this Article

anon354153
Post 5

@anon328673: I really suggest you go to your doctor.

anon328673
Post 2

I cut my labia majora whilst shaving about a week ago, and the wound won't heal and keeps weeping a clear fluid - the area has swollen up, and the glands in the groin are swollen too. How do I treat this?

anon276727
Post 1

Thanks for the informative article.

I hurt myself on my computer tower (seriously) and received a tear on my leg that wouldn't heal for a week, despite cleansing and antibiotic ointment. After seeing lots of the yellow discharge mentioned in the article (eew), I went to a walk-in clinic.

I was worried my doctor would be dismissive ("it's only a cut," "why are you wasting my time?") but he spent quite a while checking on my leg, cleaning it out and giving me prescriptions. He also mentioned that if it got worse, I should go to the ER.

Make sure you read the articles carefully -- cuts can sometimes get more serious and an ounce of prevention saves a lot of problems in the long run.

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