What Are the Signs of an Aloe Vera Allergy?

Signs of an aloe vera allergy may include a rash in the area where the aloe vera was applied.
Individuals who are allergic to onions are likely to also be allergic to aloe vera.
Aloe vera cream.
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  • Written By: Madeleine A.
  • Edited By: W. Everett
  • Last Modified Date: 16 August 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
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Signs of an aloe vera allergy include irritated, red, or inflamed skin, rash, or a burning sensation in the area of where the aloe vera was applied. In addition to allergic reactions, aloe vera can cause other symptoms that are not necessarily the result of an allergy to aloe vera, but a side effect of ingesting it. Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea can occur when aloe has been ingested, even in small amounts. When allergic reaction or gastrointestinal symptoms occur, a physician should be notified who can recommend treatment to reduce the effects.

An aloe vera allergy can be quite severe in certain people. This typically occurs when aloe vera is injected or taken orally, rather than used as a topical preparation on the skin. Signs of a severe allergy to aloe vera include low blood sugar and an electrolyte imbalance. Low blood sugar can cause lightheadedness, dizziness, shaking, and sweating. Replenishing glucose stores with juice, candy, or table sugar can often bring up blood sugar levels and eliminate symptoms.

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People who have allergies to onions, garlic, or tulips may have a propensity towards an aloe vera allergy. Certain people who use aloe topical preparations for prolonged periods of time may develop an aloe vera allergy that includes symptoms such as eczema and hives. As with many allergic skin reactions, treatment can include over-the-counter antihistamine medications. These medications, although effective in relieving inflammation and itching, can cause significant drowsiness, dizziness, and confusion. They should never be taken when driving is anticipated or when operating dangerous machinery.

Aloe juice is sometimes taken to alleviate the effects of constipation. People should discuss this method of treating constipation with their primary physicians who can warn them of side effects that can occur when aloe juice is consumed. Drinking aloe for constipation can actually increase symptoms of abdominal cramping and bloating. In addition, it can cause severe diarrhea, which if prolonged, can even lead to dehydration.

Although aloe vera is considered safe when it is added to commercial products such as lotions and gels, consuming it in its raw form may not be prudent. It is not considered harmful, however, to use a small amount of aloe gel that has been extracted from the plant to put on a burn or other minor skin irritation. Aloe gel should not be rubbed into large areas of the skin and it should never be applied to cuts or broken skin.

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Discuss this Article

anon965071
Post 5

They put aloe vera in flushable wipes? Not good for that area if you have an allergy!

anon946454
Post 4

I posted about a week ago about my allergy to aloe vera shampoo. I want to say that the day after I went off all aloe, my head completely stopped itching. I found Aloe in many products I was using every day: "Real Purity" deodorant, Naked Bee lotion, Mederma, NYC Liquid Lipshine. Mascara is a hard one, but avoid Physicians Formula. I used a baby wipe on my feet today and instantly my feet turned red and they are stinging. Baby wipes from Aldi have aloe in them.

anon329415
Post 3

I didn't know I had an aloe allergy since it is in so many cosmetics. I bought aloe juice, after drinking it and I broke out in hives all over my body. I thought I was still ok with skin contact, but now I can't wear any makeup with it- it causes my skin to get red and feels like sunburn. My daughter is also allergic. She broke out in hives all over from just having it touch her skin on her arm. I was told that is a severe reaction that could be worse next time.

indigomoth
Post 2

@Ana1234 - Well, some people like bitter foods and I've heard that some people are more sensitive to that taste than others as well. Plus you can get used to it.

It sounds like a real aloe allergy would be fairly obvious though and not just a simple sick stomach. It's probably a good idea for anyone who thinks they might try some aloe (even if it's in a drink) to only take a small amount and wait to make sure they have no allergy. Particularly if the person trying it is young, as kids can easily be killed by a severe allergic reaction.

It's probably a good idea to keep your eyes peeled for this, since I think aloe gets added to a lot of drinks these days, particularly ones that come from Asia.

Ana1234
Post 1

I have a friend who swore by eating a leaf of aloe vera every day. Her mother had told her that it was the way to keep all stomach problems at bay. So it is possible to eat aloe vera raw, although I can believe that it isn't very advisable, because when I tried it, the taste was so foul I felt sick afterwards.

I don't even know how people would be able to tell their were allergic to it, when it's that bitter.

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