What Are the Symptoms of Anger?

If a person is unable to prevent an outburst resulting from anger, then symptoms can include abusive language.
Physical responses to anger include a faster heart rate and sweating.
Difficulty with controlling anger can lead to high blood pressure.
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  • Written By: Alex Paul
  • Edited By: Angela B.
  • Last Modified Date: 25 August 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2014
    Conjecture Corporation
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Everyone reacts differently when becoming angry, so the symptoms of anger are varied. Some people don’t display any overtly physical signs of anger, but may feel hot and start to breathe quicker. Some react immediately to a situation that makes them angry, while others may experience a slow buildup of angry emotions. Physical symptoms can include a faster heart rate and sweating. If a person is unable to prevent an outburst resulting from anger, then symptoms can include abusive language, destructive behavior and aggressive outbursts.

Anger is a natural emotion, and the vast majority of people are able to control it. Some people, however, experience such strong feelings of anger that they are unable to control their actions. This can lead to problems in everyday life, especially if the person doesn’t understand that excessive anger can lead to relationship problems. The first step to controlling the problem is to know and understand the symptoms of anger.

When someone begins to feel anger, he or she may experience a number of emotions. These are the main symptoms of anger, and identifying them often allows the person to try to prevent an outburst or other angry behavior. Different people experience different emotions when becoming angry, but a feeling of tension and a rising sense of stress are two of the most common.

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There are a number of physical symptoms of anger. These can include clenching fists, often subconsciously, and an increase in heart rate. A person who is getting angry also may feel hot or start to sweat. Some people experience physical symptoms before any outburst, which allows them to prevent a negative or abusive reaction to a situation.

Many other symptoms of anger may be present, although the exact symptoms vary from person to person. Potential symptoms can include the grinding of teeth, shaking hands, goose bumps and a faster breathing rate. A person with an anger problem may not be consciously aware of these symptoms until they are pointed out.

If a person is unable to control his or her anger, then symptoms may become much more noticeable. The person is likely to have a sudden negative outburst toward a particular person, usually a loved one or the person who is seen as the cause of the problem, and may become abusive. Some people with anger problems can become destructive and may damage the surrounding environment. Other symptoms include becoming sullen and withdrawing from social situations.

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Discuss this Article

bluedolphin
Post 3

I guess we all need some help in dealing with our emotions. I don't like people who become aggressive when angry and hurt themselves or others. But it's also not good for someone to keep their emotions inside and make themselves ill because they are unable to express it. We all need a healthy way to release anger and we need to be able to control it.

I'm good at controlling my anger. I definitely look angry, one can tell from my body language and sharp looks. But I don't lash out at others, yell at or abuse them. I usually say what I have to say calmly and then vent my anger by exercising or confiding in a friend.

burcinc
Post 2

@simrin-- I'm not like that at all. I'm very shy, so when I'm angry in public, I turn red and sweat. I get a constipated look on my face because there is no way I can express my anger in public. I end up being angry and frustrated even more and then it looks like I'm having an anxiety attack.

I've been going to therapy and I am on anxiety medications, but I still can't deal with anger.

SteamLouis
Post 1

In some languages, there is an idiom people use when they're angry. It's along the lines of "my blood is boiling." It sounds funny, but this is exactly how I feel when I'm angry. It feels like my blood is flowing very quickly. My muscles get tighter, as if I'm about to fight someone.

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