What Are the Treatments for Male Frequent Urination?

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  • Written By: Meshell Powell
  • Edited By: Melissa Wiley
  • Last Modified Date: 22 July 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
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Male frequent urination can be a distressing symptom that may have a variety of causes, including urinary tract infections (UTIs), the use of certain medications, and diabetes. Prostate problems or neurological issues, such as a stroke, may also be to blame. Proper treatment begins with an accurate diagnosis, so the patient should be sure to consult a medical professional when this issue becomes a concern. In many cases, this troubling symptom can be managed by prescription medications, although surgical intervention may be indicated in some situations.

Urinary tract infections are more common in females than in males, but they may also be the cause of male frequent urination. These infections occur when bacteria enters the urinary tract through the urethra, the tube that carries urine outside of the body from the bladder. Some potential causes of UTIs in men include sexual intercourse with an infected person, a weakened immune system, or poor dietary habits. This type of infection almost always needs to be treated with prescription antibiotics.

Diabetes, a medical condition in which the body cannot properly regulate the production and storage of a hormone known as insulin, may also cause a person to urinate more than usual. A blood sugar known as glucose may build up in the bloodstream. As the body tries to get rid of the excess glucose through the urine, the patient may experience dehydration due to the frequent urination. Frequent urination in this case can often be prevented by proper management of the condition.

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Prostate problems often lead to male frequent urination. The prostate gland is part of the male reproductive system and may become enlarged due to medical issues such as an infection or cancer. Problems with this gland may also occur as a normal part of the aging process. Treatment depends on the exact nature of the disorder and may involve the use of prescription medications or even surgery.

Neurological issues, especially a stroke, may lead to frequent urination in some patients. When the nerves that supply the bladder become damaged, various urinary symptoms may develop, including frequent urination, pain when urinating, or sudden urges to urinate. Medications or surgical intervention may be able to help ease these symptoms in some patients, although it should be noted that some patients with neurological disorders do not respond to treatment.

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anon320366
Post 4

I am a 40-plus years old male, I have noticed my frequent urination at night has stopped. My doctor recommended the Dr. Max Powers Prostate support, but I told him I didn't work out! And he said that was fine, because it was recommended for guys like me who have frequent urination. I like all the natural ingredients in that product. I researched many others and none contain these ingredients. So far, it's working well.

ZipLine
Post 3

@MikeMason-- You know, frequent urination causes are many. It could be a bladder infection, a problem related to the bowels, a kidney problem, a vitamin deficiency or even a hormonal issue. If you can find the cause, you can treat it.

stoneMason
Post 2

@simrin-- I'm also experiencing frequent urination at night and a constant urge to urinate during the day. I go to the bathroom every half hour during the day, once every couple of hours at night.

My doctor hasn't been able to figure out what's wrong. He thinks that I'm experiencing inflammation and sensitivity with my bladder. I'm taking some anti-inflammatory medications for now and I've been told not to drink water after 8 or 9pm. But neither of these have treated my problem. I just hate this.

SteamLouis
Post 1

I went to the doctor with frequent urination symptoms when my diabetes was diagnosed.

I had started drinking more and more water and as a result of that, was constantly going to the bathroom. But it never occurred to me that it could be diabetes. I was worried that I might have prostatitis but I didn't have the other symptoms like pain.

My doc decided to get routine blood tests, including a blood glucose test and that's how my type 2 diabetes was diagnosed. Now I'm taking tablet medication and I still drink a lot of water, but I'm not urinating as frequently as I was before.

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