What Causes Stomach Ache and Vomiting?

A diagram of the stomach and duodenum.
A stomach ache and vomiting can be caused by an ulcer.
Drinking too much alcohol can cause stomach ache and vomiting.
Appendicitis can cause lingering aches and vomiting.
Many prescription medications list nausea and stomach discomfort as possible side effects.
Salmonella, a common cause of food poisoning, can cause a stomach ache and vomiting.
Stomach pains and vomiting may present after drinking contaminated water.
A serious condition like appendicitis can be the cause of a stomach ache and vomiting.
Stomach ache and vomiting that lasts more than 24 hours should receive medical treatment.
Article Details
  • Written By: B. Miller
  • Edited By: Andrew Jones
  • Last Modified Date: 15 October 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2014
    Conjecture Corporation
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Stomach ache and vomiting can occur for a number of different reasons. An illness such as the stomach flu or a stomach virus are among the most common causes, and may also be accompanied by diarrhea; more serious conditions such as appendicitis or an ulcer may also cause these symptoms. Food poisoning is another one of the most common causes of nausea and stomach pain.. Food allergies or food sensitivities, motion sickness, overindulgence in alcohol, or other fairly simple reasons may also cause these symptoms, which will usually pass within a few hours or a day. Nausea and vomiting are typically proceeded by stomach cramps, which can be an early warning sign that one has eaten something bad.

Typically, stomach ache and vomiting will not last for any longer than 24 hours, whatever the cause. If they do, they can lead to potentially dangerous or even fatal dehydration, so it is important to receive medical treatment. In addition, if these symptoms last for more than a day or two, they can be indicative of a more serious condition such as appendicitis. Often, this will be indicated by the presence of a fever, which will not usually occur with a simple stomach virus, though the flu can cause a fever. It is important to carefully monitor all symptoms to determine whether medical treatment is necessary.

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It is rare that a food sensitivity will cause stomach ache and vomiting, but sometimes people with a food allergy will experience these symptoms after consuming the food. Food poisoning is a far more common reason for these symptoms; again, these symptoms will typically pass within a day or two, but the severity of food poisoning often requires a visit to the emergency room anyway just to prevent dehydration. One will typically be given IV liquids for a few hours and released. Anti-nausea medication may also be given at the emergency room.

Some people find that they will experience stomach ache and vomiting after drinking too much alcohol. Others find that motion sickness causes these symptoms. In any case, it is best to stay hydrated by drinking clear liquids; many people find flat ginger ale to be particularly helpful at settling the stomach. Plain foods such as dry toast, salted crackers, or white rice can also be helpful at settling the stomach, but it is best not to reintroduce foods to the diet until vomiting has stopped.

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anon935969
Post 3

In second grade, I got a bad tummy ache after lunch at school. I felt so sick but I kept trying to hold it in and hoped it would go away. We lined up to go out and play and while we were walking down the hall, bleech -- up came my lunch, right in front of everyone. Ugh. I was so embarrassed.

I was sent to the nurse and then home and spent the next two days in bed with a very sick stomach. Must have just been a bug though, because the food didn't seem to make anyone else sick.

dimpley
Post 2

I’ve never had such stomach upset and vomiting as the time that I ate some really bad mayo. It tasted fine, and it smelled fine – but apparently it was not fine at all.

My stomach rumbled and rolled. I had severe stomach pain, headache and nausea. I was just vomiting every few minutes. It was absolutely miserable.

However, I did get over it after a few days. After the better part of one day the vomiting subsided (thank heavens) and I was able to hold down a little bland food (baked potato, no butter, no salt).

Now, I have a complete and total aversion to mayo. You can keep that rotten stuff.

JessiC
Post 1

When my son was just a toddler I noticed that things had gotten really quiet suddenly, and I naturally went in search of what had my rowdy one so thoroughly occupied.

I found him in the kitchen, which was baby proofed to the max. But he had found the one thing I had not thought of putting out of his reach – a house plant. My little one apparently had taken a liking to this plant, because he had eaten almost all of the leaves by the time I got to him.

It wasn’t long before he started to cry, and I figured it was a stomachache. But after just a little longer, I became really worried that this plant could actually do some harm. I called poison control, and told them the type of plant and about how much he had eaten.

That is when the poor baby started to throw up all over place. The poison control guy said this was actually a good thing because that particular plant could be poisonous. Since he was throwing up the leaves, he would feel better much faster.

He also advised me to keep a very good watch on him for the next several hours to make sure he didn’t become lethargic or anything like that, and told me to give him as much milk as he could drink.

I also took that house plant and threw it out.

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