What Is a Headrush?

Rising from a seated position can cause sudden dizziness known as a headrush.
Blurred vision may accompany a headrush.
Article Details
  • Written By: Mary McMahon
  • Edited By: O. Wallace
  • Last Modified Date: 03 August 2014
  • Copyright Protected:
    2003-2014
    Conjecture Corporation
  • Print this Article

A headrush is a sudden sensation of dizziness which occurs when someone rises from a seated position. Headrushes are often accompanied by a variety of other symptoms, which vary depending on the root cause of the headrush. Many people have experienced a headrush at some point in their lives, but persistent headrushes can indicate that there is an underlying medical problem which needs to be addressed.

Usually, the strange sensation passes after a few seconds, although it can be very disorienting. Someone experiencing a headrush may feel like he or she is about to fall, and the desire to hold onto something such as a chair or table for balance may be intense.

Several things can cause a headrush. Commonly, headrushes are associated with balance disorders, in which the inner ear is not functioning like it should be, so the body feels out of balance. In fact, the body is perfectly well balanced, but the inner ear thinks that it is not, and as a result, neurotransmitters start to fire in an attempt to correct the problem. In these cases, the headrush may be accompanied with a sense of spinning or shifting out of place, and vomiting, nausea, and blurred vision are not uncommon.

Ad

Drops in blood pressure can also cause a headrush. In a classic example, blood pools in the extremities of someone seated for a long time, and when he or she rises, it takes a minute for the blood to reach the brain. Until it does, a sensation of lightheadedness, spotty vision, or dizziness may be experienced. Orthostatic hypotension, as this type of blood pressure disorder is formally known, is more common in older people.

Some illnesses are also associated with headrushes, ranging from neurological problems to conditions associated with drug abuse. While a headrush now and then is fairly normal, if someone experiences repeated headrushes or headrushes which are unusually long, it is time for a trip to the doctor. The doctor can diagnose the root cause of the headrushes, prescribing treatment which will address the problem and hopefully eliminate the headrushes in the process.

Treatment for conditions which cause headrushes is quite diverse, and can include the use of medication, physical therapy, dietary recommendations, increased exercise, and so forth. Sometimes, headrushes have a genetic component, which may make them difficult to eliminate entirely, although the severity of the dizzy spells can be reduced.

Ad

Discuss this Article

anon260649
Post 7

I am getting extremely frequent headaches and headrushes, and it's starting to worry me because it's so regular. I also feel as though there's a lot of pressure on my head?

anon192697
Post 6

Thanks for the info. I have Autonomic Small Fiber Neuropathy and didn't know if my head rushes were normal and if what I experienced was just like other people or if mine were different and caused by the disorder. This site help me determine that the disorder is probably the cause of my head rushes. I appreciate the help.

anon124158
Post 5

What about self-provoked head rushes? I read a how-to somewhere and I tried it today, was really funny, but it hurt my head and affected my blood pressure. I passed out for like two seconds only to wake up a little out of myself. I laughed maniacally for like two minutes until I got back into consciousness. It was awkward.

anon87555
Post 4

I often experience head rushes. is it common for your head to feel like there is pressure on it while experiencing a head rush?

anon49260
Post 3

thanks for educating me. i really like that. just go on in providing education for the people like me who are curious to know more.

anon48053
Post 2

I think it's excellent web site.Do you have any information about forgetting information and cause of it.

Moderator's reply: Perhaps this article will help. http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-brain-fog.htm

Post your comments

Post Anonymously

Login

username
password
forgot password?

Register

username
password
confirm
email