What is Analgesic Spray?

"Analgesics" is another word for painkillers, and an analgesic spray is a painkiller delivered by a pump or pressurized container. Such sprays are topical, meaning that they are applied to the surfaces of the body, most commonly the skin but sometimes the eyes or mucous membranes, such as the throat. Topical painkillers also come in the form of creams, ointments, gels and balms. Some sprays are available over the counter, and others require a prescription. They are often used to treat various forms of joint and muscle pain caused by sports-related injuries or arthritis, as well as painful skin irritations such as sunburn and itching.

One common active ingredient in analgesic spray is non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as salicylates and ibuprofen. Other sprays contain natural analgesics such as essential oils, derived from herbs and plants, or capsicum extracts such as capsaicin, derived from hot peppers. White flower analgesic, one such natural product, is a blend of several essential oils, including wintergreen, eucalyptus, peppermint, menthol, camphor and lavender.

There are also cooling sprays that work by refrigerating, or freezing, the affected area. This type of analgesic spray has the added benefit of providing immediate relief. Other topical analgesics usually take at least half an hour to start working.

A common reason for using a spray or other topical painkiller, rather than a painkiller taken by mouth, is that topical treatments work directly on the affected area. This means a lower risk of adverse side effects, because the medication does not spread throughout the entire body. For example, painkillers containing ibuprofen might cause a seriously upset stomach when taken orally, but an analgesic spray containing the same substance will not cause such problems. Topical treatments can have side effects, but these usually are localized to the treated area without involving other parts of the body.

It is not fully understood how all topical analgesics work, but it is known that they affect the body's nervous system. Some are believed to act as counter-irritants, compounds that somehow block or interfere with the pain impulses in the nerve fibers. Scientific studies have shown that analgesic sprays and other topical analgesics can provide safe, fast and effective relief for many kinds of pain, but that oral painkillers are more effective when treating headaches and chronic pain. Topical analgesics should not be applied to open wounds, and it is recommended that one consults a doctor before using them. Pregnant and nursing women should be especially careful before using a spray or any other topical pain treatment.

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Raynbow
Post 3

@rundocuri- I think that you should try using a natural analgesic spray containing camphor and menthol. This type of treatment is safe to use, plus the natural remedies have scents that naturally keep many types of bugs away.

Heavanet
Post 2

@rundocuri- It sounds like you might be having allergic reactions to bug bites, because not all of them should cause you to experience a lot of pain. I think that you should talk to your doctor about this problem before you use any over-the-counter medication.

Once a medical professional rules out any serious reactions that you might be experiencing, you should be able to use an analgesic spray when bug bites cause you excessive pain. You doctor will be able to tell you which one will be best for you.

Rundocuri
Post 1

Does anyone use analgesic spray for bug bites? I seem to attract bugs in the warm months, and bug bites are often very painful to me.

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