What Is Valine?

Mushrooms contain valine.
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  • Written By: Douglas Bonderud
  • Edited By: Michelle Arevalo
  • Last Modified Date: 24 October 2014
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Valine is an amino acid necessary for human health. It is known as a branched chain amino acid (BCAA). This amino acid functions as a stimulant and promotes muscle repair. It was first isolated in 1901 by Emil Fischer, a German chemist. Foods such as fish, cottage cheese, poultry, mushrooms, and brown rice are all high in this amino acid.

Also known as Val or simply V, this is one of the three BCAAs which are required for the human body to function properly. Leucine and isoleucine, in combination with it, account for 70% of the amino acids present in a human body's proteins. Valine is responsible for encouraging normal human growth, repairing tissue, and regulating blood sugar. A lack of this amino acid results in diminished mental functioning.

This substance is known as an essential amino acid, which means that the body cannot produce it on its own, and that dietary sources are necessary. It is possible to be deficient in valine, despite the abundance of natural sources available. Individuals on low-fat diets and those who do a great deal of strength training may need supplements, as they may not be getting enough of it in their food, or may be outstripping its ability to repair muscle tissue. A lack of it in the human body can cause nerve damage by degrading the nerves' myelin coverings, and this can lead to neurological disorders.

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An excess of valine can give rise to hallucinations and a interrupt liver function. A condition known as maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) occurs when the human body is unable to metabolize valine or any other BCAA. This condition causes the urine to smell like maple syrup. Additional BCAA supplements are not recommended in this case.

In addition to healthy muscle development, valine can help to prevent loss of muscle tissue in patients with diabetes. It also detoxifies ammonia in the body with the help of alpha-ketoglutarate. This can prevent hospitalized and elderly patients from succumbing to ammonia toxicity. It has been suggested that this amino acid can also aid in the treatment of liver and brain damage caused by alcohol.

Although there is no direct scientific evidence to support valine's function as a muscle growth supplement, it is taken by many bodybuilders for this purpose. If taken as a supplement, this should be balanced with the other two BCAAs. The recommended ratio is two milligrams of valine and leucine for each milligram of isoleucine taken.

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anon331505
Post 3

Anyone know how livestock obtain valine in their diet?

Azuza
Post 2

@sunnySkys - Yes, some fat in our diets is definitely necessary.

I think it's interesting that this amino acid might help in treating liver and brain damage caused by alcohol. Alcoholism is a disease that can take a devastating toll on the alcoholic and the alcoholics family.

It seems so unfair that when they finally do go into recovery and stop drinking they have all these other health problems. Liver damage, pancreatic problems, and of course possible damage to the brain. I know a few recovered alcoholics and let me tell you their mental function is definitely not what it used to be. Maybe there will eventually be a valine based treatment to help them.

sunnySkys
Post 1

I've always thought low-fat diets were a dumb idea and now I have some evidence to back it up! Eating too much fat is obviously a bad idea but humans need some fat because of the amino acids such as valine.

Now I understand why all my friends get so grouchy and out of it when they're on a diet! In addition to being hungry they probably have impaired mental function from lack of amino acids.

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