What Is Vitamin T?

Vitamin T is believed to help strengthen red blood cells.
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  • Written By: Matt Brady
  • Edited By: Jenn Walker
  • Last Modified Date: 30 August 2014
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Vitamin T, or torulitine, is a substance found in egg yolks and sesame seeds. It is thought by some to improve memory and concentration, and to help strengthen red blood cells. In spite of its name, Vitamin T doesn't meet the standard definition for being a vitamin. Indeed, many don't consider it to be a vitamin at all. Despite its purported health benefits in certain circles, very little is actually known about it. Torulitine may be heard more often in its use as a slang term for testosterone or tequila.

A true vitamin is generally defined as a nutrient that, in small doses, is important to regulating metabolism in the body. A, B, C, D, E and K vitamins all fit this definition. In the case of torulitine, however, there is no consensus that the substance meets this criterion. Most resources do not include it, even informally, in their listings of vitamins.

This vitamin is water-soluble, and can be destroyed by alcohol. It's found in egg yolks, sesame seeds, as well as the sesame seed paste, tahini. Due to its prevalence in sesame seeds, it's also known as the Sesame Seed Factor. Although little is agreed upon about its health benefits, most sources do seem to indicate that it has been associated with strengthening red blood cells. By bolstering blood cells, the substance may be an effective combatant in blood-cell related ailments, such as anemia and blood hemolysis.

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Not being recognized as a vitamin—or even as an important health supplement—by many medical experts poses some difficulties for those wishing to factor torulitine into a diet. All vitamins have a recommended dietary allowance (RDA) that informs exactly how much of a particular nutrient a person should consume per day. RDAs also help determine what a nutrient's toxic levels are, and what symptoms will result in the case of an overdose. None of this information, however, is known about this so-called vitamin, making it hard to assess whether one should be consuming it regularly, and in what quantities.

Most vitamins come in a supplemental form as well as in their natural food groups. torulitine, on the other hand, is hard to locate outside of eggs and sesame seeds. Anyone looking to add this so-called vitamin to their daily dose of vitamin caplets may find it difficult to track down a supplement. This, again, is probably a side effect of Vitamin T not being well understood, and therefore not adopted by many medical organizations or health food suppliers.

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Discuss this Article

anon325724
Post 5

A well rounded diet isn't good enough. Most people have deficiencies in their digestive processes so they can't digest and make these nutrients bio-available.

It's not just vitamins (vital minerals) that are the problem; they need enzymes. The standard American diet is almost void of these enzymes. If you don't have the correct balance, no matter how much or little you eat well and take vitamins, it does you no good.

This compound referred to as Vitamin T isn't actually a vital mineral (vitamin). Meaning if you go without it, you will not get sick and die.

Another thing: there doesn't have to be any medical backing for it to be sold in stores. However, I do believe they need to rename the product, though.

anon261019
Post 3

I feel that it doesn't have any medical backing for it to be available in stores. It is naturally in the foods that we eat every day.

jessica500
Post 2

In my opinion, people have gotten crazy with taking vitamins. If people would just eat a well-rounded diet, they should get almost everything they need from their food. This obsession with vitamins and supplements is making manufacturers rich. Some of them are not even clinically proven. Again, this is just my opinion, but I think we need to stop taking pills and focus on better food.

scifreak
Post 1

I went to a vitamin store in search of vitamin T one time after I read an article. The woman who worked there said she had never heard of it. I guess it really does not have any medical backing or else it would be available in stores.

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